Registration for class visits is now closed. If you’d like to visit any of the classes listed below, please contact Ania Kowalik (anna-kowalik@iowa.edu) directly.

 

Celebrate TILE Days: Spring 2018 Opportunities (Monday, March 26 - Friday, March 30)

 

Celebrate TILE Days is a new open classroom initiative where faculty teaching in TILE in a given semester volunteer to open their classrooms to showcase some of their teaching strategies to other “TILE-enabled” colleagues who would like to observe. Faculty teaching demonstrations have been one of the most popular feature of TILE Essentials and we hope that Celebrate TILE Week will further sustain the TILE community, help instructors disseminate interesting, effective teaching strategies in TILE classrooms, and foster conversations about teaching.

 

Please review the TILE classes below. If you are interested in visiting the class, click "register." Please note there is a limit on the number of visitors each class can accommodate. If you have any questions, please contact TILE at tile@uiowa.edu

 

Monday, March 26


Host: Brandon Myers, Computer Science 

ClassCS 2630 Computer Organization

Computer Organization is an intermediate-level required course for Computer Science and other computing related majors. Students learn how to a) build a computer processor out of digital circuitry, b) build the tools to used to program the processor, and c) write about innovations in computer systems. Spring 2018 is my third semester teaching the course in TILE. During class, students work in groups of 4 on inquiry-based activities. These groups of 4 stay together for a few weeks before rotating.

Keywords: Inquiry, group work, lab work.

Date: Monday, March 26

Time: 12:30 pm - 1:20 pm

Location: 350 VAN

Visitor Limit: 10

Register

HostKristine Muñoz, Spanish and Portuguese  

Class: SPAN 3215 Medellin

Historical, cultural, political and geographical exploration of the city of Medellín, Colombia. Taught in Spanish. 

Keywords: Interactive lecture, in-class writing. 

Date: Monday, March 26

Time: 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm

Location: 214 BHC

Visitor Limit: 6 

Register

HostAlison Bianchi, Sociology

ClassSOC 4200 Sociology of Religion

This course is an introduction to the study of religion from a sociological perspective. Religions exist in social contexts, are shaped by the contexts in which they are embedded, and in turn, often change those social contexts. To understand the complex relation between religions and other social systems, we must examine the sociological as well as the historical, anthropological, social psychological, and political impacts of religion on social behavior. This course provides the student with tools to study religious organizations critically and objectively. We will explore and debate the classical sociological theories pertaining to religions, as well as contemporary theories that describe and predict religious behavior. This course will not focus on particular religious philosophies. Instead, a social scientific perspective will be presented that will allow students to form theories, opinions and critical analyses of their own. And, while the material focuses on religion in the United States, students who wish to use a cross-cultural perspective in discussions and papers are encouraged to do so.

Keywords: Interactive lecture, in-class activity. 

Date: Monday, March 26

Time: 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm

Location: 350 VAN

Visitor Limit: 9

Register

Tuesday, March 27


Host: Ken Mobily, Health and Human Physiology 

Class: DST 1101 Introduction to Disability Studies

Disability studies is a discipline concerned with the contrast between medical models and social construction models of disability. Linton, Mello and O’Neill (1994) maintain that disability studies focuses on the cultural, social and political meanings of disability in preference to the medical and treatment approaches to disability. Disability studies does not deny the reality of the impairment, but instead focuses on how disability has been constructed historically, socially and politically in an effort to distinguish myth and stigma from reality. The Chicago School approach to disability studies adds the perspective that disability is part of a continuum of the human experience that touches everyone sooner or later (Taylor & Zubal-Ruggieri, 2003). It’s inter-disciplinary insofar as many academic areas have narratives and dialogues to offer about the experience of disability in society. The multitude of academic areas with voices in disability studies include (but are not limited to): History, Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, English and Literature, Speech and Audiology, Law, Women’s Studies, Special Education, Dance, Art, Medicine, Philosophy, and Therapeutic Recreation. This course is a requirement for the disability studies certificate and designed to provide an introductory overview of several important topics and discussions that pertain to the experience and legacy of being disabled. Topics include: definitions of what constitutes “normal” and its impact on disability, eugenics (in its various forms), disability awareness and identity, intersections (areas in which disability is related to other issues, such as women’s rights, civil rights, etc.), laws & public policy, judicial rulings, and policies that pertain to disability rights, social change movements (such as disability rights, inclusion, normalization, integration, inclusion, etc.), how disabled persons are portrayed in media and stigma formation and management.

Keywords: In-class activities usually requiring research and readings, In-class writing assignments, usually in response to info. provided, In-class creative projects; short screenings; TED talks; etc.

Date: Tuesday, March 27

Time: 9:30 am - 10:45 am

Location: 350 Van Allen

Visitor Limit: 6

Register

Host: Charles Munro, Journalism & Mass Communication 

ClassJMC 3181 The Business of Sport Communication

This is a journalism school course cross listed with sports studies. We look at how sports businesses operate, particularly in how they interact with fans through branding, promotion, and creative content. I teach it in the Van Allen bldg, which does not have the technical facilities of other TILE classrooms but we make do. 

Keywords: Group work, self-directed discussion, peer review and critique.

Date: Tuesday, March 27, 2018 

Time: 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm

Location: 469 VAN 

Visitor Limit: 2

Register

Hosts: Nancy Langguth, Education & Ann Browning, Teaching & Learning 

Class: EDTL 3091 Secondary Education Program Orientation & Classroom Management

Secondary Education Program Orientation & Classroom Management EDTL:3091 is designed to help students recently admitted to Secondary Education Program areas at the University of Iowa transition from student to teacher through providing students information regarding opportunities, policies and procedures, requirements and expectations, and services associated with the Teacher Education Program. Additionally, the course affords students the opportunity to engage in reflective dialogue with Teacher Education Program peers regarding topics such as their decision to enter the profession; the secondary school environment; factors associated with establishing and maintaining an environment conducive to teaching and learning; and professional conduct, ethics, rights and responsibilities. In tandem with this program overview, through assigned readings, class discussions, written assignments, class presentations, and guest presenters, students will become familiar with concepts and principles that teachers can use when thinking about the managerial tasks encountered in the classroom; thus, gaining an understanding of research-based principles, concepts, and practices for creating classrooms conducive to teaching and learning, and to begin applying this research base to their own developing management philosophy and management plans.

Keywords: Interactive lecture, table group activities, use of laptops for an in-time submission.

Date: Tuesday, March 27

Time: 5:00 pm - 6:15 pm

Location: 134 Trowbridge Hall

Visitor Limit: 20

Register

 

 

Wednesday, March 28


Host: Brandon Myers, Computer Science 

ClassCS 2630 Computer Organization

Computer Organization is an intermediate-level required course for Computer Science and other computing related majors. Students learn how to a) build a computer processor out of digital circuitry, b) build the tools to used to program the processor, and c) write about innovations in computer systems. Spring 2018 is my third semester teaching the course in TILE. During class, students work in groups of 4 on inquiry-based activities. These groups of 4 stay together for a few weeks before rotating.

Keywords: Inquiry, group work, lab work.

Date: Wednesday, March 28

Time: 12:30 pm - 1:20 pm

Location: 350 VAN

Visitor Limit: 10

Register

Host: Alison Phillips, Health and Human Physiology

ClassHealth Communication and Coaching Strategies

This course will address the expected communication skill set for health promotion professionals, including the evidence-based development, strategic dissemination, and critical evaluation of relevant, accurate, accessible, and understandable health information communicated to individuals to advance their health. This course will also address skills involved in health coaching, including processes that facilitate healthy, sustainable behavior change. Health coaching strategies will include motivational interviewing, goal setting, and social support. Through lecture, discussion, and group work, students will gain understanding in several areas that are consistent with the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing “Areas of Responsibilities, Competencies, and Sub-competencies for the Health Education Specialists 2015” including: effectively disseminating health-related information to the public; identifying, developing and delivering effective messages using a variety of communication strategies; and engaging in advocacy for health education/promotion.

Keywords: Group activities, using classroom technology to share media, classroom discussion.

Date: Wednesday, March 28

Time: 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Location: 1140 LIB

Visitor Limit: 6

Register

HostKristine Muñoz, Spanish and Portuguese   

Class: SPAN 3215 Medellin

Historical, cultural, political and geographical exploration of the city of Medellín, Colombia. Taught in Spanish. 

Keywords: Interactive lecture, in-class writing. 

Date: Wednesday, March 28

Time: 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm

Location: 214 BHC

Visitor Limit: 6 

Register

 

 

Thursday, March 29


Host: Ken Mobily, Health & Human Physiology 

Class: DST 1101 Introduction to Disability Studies

Disability studies is a discipline concerned with the contrast between medical models and social construction models of disability. Linton, Mello and O’Neill (1994) maintain that disability studies focuses on the cultural, social and political meanings of disability in preference to the medical and treatment approaches to disability. Disability studies does not deny the reality of the impairment, but instead focuses on how disability has been constructed historically, socially and politically in an effort to distinguish myth and stigma from reality. The Chicago School approach to disability studies adds the perspective that disability is part of a continuum of the human experience that touches everyone sooner or later (Taylor & Zubal-Ruggieri, 2003). It’s inter-disciplinary insofar as many academic areas have narratives and dialogues to offer about the experience of disability in society. The multitude of academic areas with voices in disability studies include (but are not limited to): History, Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, English and Literature, Speech and Audiology, Law, Women’s Studies, Special Education, Dance, Art, Medicine, Philosophy, and Therapeutic Recreation. This course is a requirement for the disability studies certificate and designed to provide an introductory overview of several important topics and discussions that pertain to the experience and legacy of being disabled. Topics include: definitions of what constitutes “normal” and its impact on disability, eugenics (in its various forms), disability awareness and identity, intersections (areas in which disability is related to other issues, such as women’s rights, civil rights, etc.), laws & public policy, judicial rulings, and policies that pertain to disability rights, social change movements (such as disability rights, inclusion, normalization, integration, inclusion, etc.), how disabled persons are portrayed in media and stigma formation and management.

Keywords: In-class activities usually requiring research and readings, In-class writing assignments, usually in response to info. provided, In-class creative projects; short screenings; TED talks; etc.

Date: Thursday, March 29

Time: 9:30 am - 10:45 am

Location: 350 Van Allen

Visitor Limit: 6

Register

Friday, March 30


Host: Brandon Myers, Computer Science 

ClassCS 2630 Computer Organization

Computer Organization is an intermediate-level required course for Computer Science and other computing related majors. Students learn how to a) build a computer processor out of digital circuitry, b) build the tools to used to program the processor, and c) write about innovations in computer systems. Spring 2018 is my third semester teaching the course in TILE. During class, students work in groups of 4 on inquiry-based activities. These groups of 4 stay together for a few weeks before rotating.

Keywords: Inquiry, group work, lab work.

Date: Friday, March 30

Time: 12:30pm - 1:20pm

Location: 350 VAN

Visitor Limit: 10

Register

Host: Alison Phillips, Health and Human Physiology

ClassHealth Communication and Coaching Strategies

This course will address the expected communication skill set for health promotion professionals, including the evidence-based development, strategic dissemination, and critical evaluation of relevant, accurate, accessible, and understandable health information communicated to individuals to advance their health. This course will also address skills involved in health coaching, including processes that facilitate healthy, sustainable behavior change. Health coaching strategies will include motivational interviewing, goal setting, and social support. Through lecture, discussion, and group work, students will gain understanding in several areas that are consistent with the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing “Areas of Responsibilities, Competencies, and Sub-competencies for the Health Education Specialists 2015” including: effectively disseminating health-related information to the public; identifying, developing and delivering effective messages using a variety of communication strategies; and engaging in advocacy for health education/promotion.

Keywords: Group activities, using classroom technology to share media, classroom discussion.

Date: Friday, March 30

Time: 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Location: 1140 LIB

Visitor Limit: 6

Register